An international survey of perceptions of the 2014 FIFA World Cup: national levels of corruption as a context for perceptions of institutional corruption

John B. Nezlek*, David B. Newman, Astrid Schütz, Roy F. Baumeister, Joanna Schug, Mohsen Joshanloo, Paulo N. Lopes, Nicholas P. Alt, Marzena Cypryańska, Marco Depietri, Oleg Gorbaniuk, Pascal Huguet, Konstantinos Kafetsios, Selda Koydemir, Peter Kuppens, Sanghee Park, Alvaro San Martin, Juliette Schaafsma, Dora Simunovic, Kunihiro Yokota

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

We conducted a survey about the 2014 FIFA World Cup that measured attitudes about FIFA, players, and officials in 18 languages with 4600 respondents from 29 countries. Sixty percent of respondents perceived FIFA officials as being dishonest, and people from countries with less institutional corruption and stronger rule of law perceived FIFA officials as being more corrupt and less competent running the tournament than people from countries with more corruption and weaker rule of law. In contrast, respondents evaluated players as skilled and honest and match officials as competent and honest. We discuss the implications of our findings for perceptions of corruption in general.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0222492
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume14
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2019

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