Analyzing the potential of selected gut commensal strains to produce antimicrobial peptides: phenotypic and in silico approaches

M. Fonseca*, D. Machado, R. Vedor, J. C. Andrade, A. M. Gomes, J. C. Barbosa

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterpeer-review

Abstract

The World Health Organization estimates that the number of antibiotic resistance-related deaths could reach 10 million by 2050 [1]. Given the dynamics and high diversity of microorganisms that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract, this is the ideal place to discover new antimicrobial peptides (AMP) to replace traditional antibiotics [2]. Among the most extensively studied members are the commensal strains Akkermansia muciniphila DSM 22959 and Faecalibacterium duncaniae DSM 17677, which are reported to have a beneficial impact on intestinal health [3;4]. Antimicrobial peptides are small molecules that act as the first line of defense against microbial invaders, playing a vital role in the innate immune system [5]. One approach to identify new strategies to combat antimicrobial resistance is to evaluate the ability of these bacteria to produce AMP.
Original languageEnglish
Pages1-1
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2024
EventEncontro Ciência 2024: +Ciência para Uma Só Saúde e bem-estar global - Alfândega do Porto, Porto, Portugal
Duration: 3 Jul 20245 Jul 2024
https://www.encontrociencia.pt/

Conference

ConferenceEncontro Ciência 2024
Country/TerritoryPortugal
CityPorto
Period3/07/245/07/24
Internet address

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