Risco biológico e/ou químico eventualmente associado ao uso de adereços pelo trabalhador (como anéis, alianças, relógios, pulseiras)

Translated title of the contribution: Biological and/or chemical risk eventually associated with worker use of jewellery (such as rings, alliances, watches, bracelets)

M. Santos, C. Lopes, T. Oliveira, A. Almeida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Introduction/ background/ objectives There are some manuals of Good Practices, in some professional sectors, that highlight the need to stop use jewelry at work (such as finger rings, watches, bracelets and/ or equivalent), relating to the potentialization of contact with biological agents and/ or chemical. The studies dedicated to this theme are very scarce and all related to health professionals; although, in many other sectors, it is a relevant topic, like in food production, tattooing, preparation of equipment that needs to be sterile and any sector that deals with chemical agents, for example. Methodology It is an Scoping Review, initiated through a research conducted in December 2019 in the databases “CINALH plus with full text, Medline with full text, Database of Effects Review Abstracts, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Methodology Record, Nursing and Allied Health Collection: comprehensive, MedicLatina, Scopus and RCAAP ”.Content The use of finger rings decreases efficacy of hand washing, since some bacteria can remain in microscopic irregularities under the ring. In addition, they can tear the protective gloves; even so, the use of this individual protective equipment attenuates the microbial load of the rings. However, some investigators argue that there is no statistical evidence that the use of rings will alter postoperative infraction rates. Those with smooth surfaces, like classic wedding rings, do not appear to be so problematic. As for watches and bracelets, it appears that they do not contribute to a significant increase in the rate of infringement; yet some researchers recommend that they be removed, before hand washing. The use of nail varnish decreases efficacy of hand washing, since some bacteria can remain in the microscopic irregularities of the varnish; however, there is no robust statistical evidence that the use of varnishes alters the rate of postoperative infection. Long nails have a higher microbial load, especially if recovered by irregular varnish (with a few days). In addition, big nails can also increase the likelihood of tearing the glove, whether natural or artificial. So it makes sense that some professionals use them short. Since scientific evidence that correlates hospital infection to the use of artificial jewelry or nails among healthcare professionals is not very robust, the norms at some institutions are in the format of recommendations only. Conclusions Studies are scarce and do not appear to be concordant or robust on several occasions, so it would be useful that Occupational Health teams, from companies with biological and/ or chemical risk, design and carry out studies and, subsequently, publish it to specialty magazines. In doubt, until clear evidence appears, objects such as finger rings, rings, watches and bracelets should be removed before work and hand washing and the size of long/ artificial nails or varnish must be carefully pondered.
Translated title of the contributionBiological and/or chemical risk eventually associated with worker use of jewellery (such as rings, alliances, watches, bracelets)
Original languagePortuguese
Number of pages12
JournalRevista Portuguesa de Saúde Ocupacional
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jun 2020

Keywords

  • Biological risk
  • Chemical risk
  • Rings
  • Watches
  • Bracelets
  • Occupational health
  • Occupational medicine

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