Does symptom recognition improve self-care in patients with heart failure? A pilot study randomised controlled trial

Joana Pereira Sousa, Hugo Neves, Miguel Pais-Vieira

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Abstract

Patients with heart failure have difficulty in self-care management, as daily monitoring and recognition of symptoms do not readily trigger an action to avoid hospital admissions. The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of a nurse-led complex intervention on symptom recognition and fluid restriction. A latent growth model was designed to estimate the longitudinal effect of a nursing-led complex intervention on self-care management and quality-of-life changes in patients with heart failure and assessed by a pilot study performed on sixty-three patients (33 control, 30 intervention). Patients in the control group had a higher risk of hospitalisation (IRR 11.36; p < 0.001) and emergency admission (IRR 4.24; p < 0.001) at three-months follow-up. Analysis of the time scores demonstrated that the intervention group had a clear improvement in self-care behaviours (beta Slope. Assignment_group = -0.881; p < 0.001) and in the quality of life (beta Slope. Assignment_group = 1.739; p < 0.001). This study supports that a nurse-led programme on symptom recognition and fluid restriction can positively impact self-care behaviours and quality of life in patients with heart failure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)418-429
Number of pages12
Journal Nursing Reports
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2021

Keywords

  • Heart failure
  • Self-care behaviours
  • Symptom recognition
  • Nurse-led programme

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