Efecto de la aplicación de dióxido de carbono de alta presión a la leche materna para producir la inactivación de las bacterias aerobias mesófilas y la Escherichia coli

Translated title of the contribution: Effect of high-pressure carbon dioxide processing on the inactivation of aerobic mesophilic bacteria and Escherichia coli in human milk

Ana Claudia Berenhauser, Douglas Soares, Norton Komora, Juliano De Dea Lindner, Elane Schwinden Prudêncio, J. Vladimir Oliveira, Jane Mara Block*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

The effect of high-pressure carbon dioxide processing on inactivation of aerobic mesophilic bacteria and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 inoculated in human milk was investigated. The effect of the ratio between sample mass and CO2 (1:0.2; 1:0.6 and 1:1 m/m); depressurization rate (1, 5.5 and 10 MPa/min); and pressure cycling (1, 3 and 5) were the process variables studied. The best reductions in aerobic mesophilic bacteria as well as in E. coli (>6.0 and >5.0 log, respectively) were obtained with a ratio of 1:1, a depressurization rate of 10 MPa/min, and one cycle of pressurization/depressurization. The depressurization rate was found to be an important variable in the inactivation process. The results suggest that high-pressure carbon dioxide processing can be applied to human milk as a safe alternative to the pasteurization employed in human milk banks.
Translated title of the contributionEffect of high-pressure carbon dioxide processing on the inactivation of aerobic mesophilic bacteria and Escherichia coli in human milk
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)122-126
Number of pages5
JournalCYTA - Journal of Food
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Aerobic mesophilic bacteria
  • Escherichia coli
  • High-pressure carbon dioxide
  • Human milk
  • Microbial inactivation

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