Freeze-drying processes applied to melon peel: assessment of physicochemical attributes and intrinsic microflora survival during storage

Sengly Sroy, Fátima A. Miller*, Joana F. Fundo, Cristina L. M. Silva, Teresa R. S. Brandão*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Melon peel is recognized as a source of healthy nutrients and oxidant compounds. Being considered a non-edible part with no profit value, large amounts of melon rinds are discharged by fruit industries. Innovative food ingredients with potential health benefits may arise if these parts were conveniently transformed. The objective was to freeze-dry small melon peel cubes to attain a potential edible matrix. An ozone pre-treatment was applied seeking decontamination purposes and quality retention. The effect of these processes was assessed in terms of physicochemical parameters (moisture content, water activity and color), bioactive compounds (total phenolics, vitamin C and chlorophylls) and antioxidant capacity, during 7 weeks of storage at room temperature. Intrinsic microflora (mesophylls, yeasts and molds) were also monitored. Results showed that the freeze-drying process allowed retention of the most bioactive compounds analyzed, except for total phenolic content. In this case, the ozone pre-treatment was important for phenolics preservation. During the storage period, ozonated samples presented a higher content of bioactive compounds. In terms of microflora, the ozone and freeze-drying effects were not significant. Freeze-drying proved to be a suitable preservation method for melon peel. The ozone impact was not relevant in terms of decontamination.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1499
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalFoods
Volume11
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 May 2022

Keywords

  • Ozone pre-treatment
  • Bioactive compounds
  • Antioxidant activity
  • Total mesophylls
  • Molds and yeasts

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