High-dose spironolactone changes renin and aldosterone levels in acutely decompensated heart failure

João Pedro Ferreira*, Mário Santos, Sofia Almeida, Irene Marques, Paulo Bettencourt, Henrique Carvalho

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In acutely decompensated heart failure (ADHF) patients with higher aldosterone levels correlate with worse postdischarge outcomes, suggesting that further modulation of the mineralocorticoid system during or immediately after hospitalization might favorably improve outcomes. Methods and results: This was an observational, retrospective secondary analysis of a study including 100 patients with ADHF. In that study 50 patients were submitted to spironolactone treatment (50-100 mg/day). A higher proportion of patients with renin levels above 16.5 pg/mL and aldosterone levels above 100 ng/dL were observed in subjects submitted to spironolactone treatment (44.7% vs. 66.7% and 56% vs. 64.7%, respectively, both p < 0.05). In the group of patients submitted to spironolactone treatment the proportion of patients with renin and aldosterone levels above the cutoff had a significant increase from baseline to day 3 (24-32% and 16-44%, respectively, both p < 0.05). Log renin and aldosterone were higher in patients with renin and aldosterone levels above the cutoff point (both p < 0.05). Conclusions: High-dose spironolactone added to standard ADHF therapy induces an additional increase in renin and aldosterone levels. Whether higher levels of renin and aldosterone due to the reactive response to full MRA still have prognostic value requires further investigation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e463-e470
JournalCor et Vasa
Volume56
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acute heart failure
  • Aldosterone
  • Antagonism
  • Mineralocorticoid receptor
  • Renin

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