Microscopic and Molecular Identification of Cyclospora cayetanensis and Cystoisospora belli in HIV-Infected People in Tabriz, Northwest of Iran

Saba Ramezanzadeh, Gholamreza Barzegar, Hamid Owaysee Osquee, Majid Pirestani, Mahmoud Mahami-Oskouei, Maryam Hajizadeh, Seyed Abdollah Hosseini, Sonia M. Rodrigues Oliveira, Mahmoud Agholi, Maria de Lourdes Pereira*, Ehsan Ahmadpour*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Opportunistic pathogens such as Cryptosporidium, Cystoisospora belli, and Cyclospora cayetanensis cause various gastrointestinal and non-digestive disorders in people with HIV/AIDS. These symptoms are especially severe in HIV-infected people who have a CD4+ count of less than 200 cells/mL. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of C. belli and C. cayetanensis infections among people living with HIV in Tabriz, northwest of Iran. This descriptive study was performed on 137 people with HIV who had been referred to behavioral disease counseling centers in Tabriz. Then, after receiving written consent, fecal samples were collected and evaluated for the detection of parasitic infections using direct methods and modified acid fast staining, as well as polymerase chain reaction (PCR).From the 137 fecal samples collected (98 males and 39 females, between 20 and 40 years old), 1.5% were positive for C. cayetanensis and 2.9% were positive for C. belli. Due to the prevalence of C. cayetanensis and C. belli in people with HIV in Tabriz, essential measures, including personal hygiene training for infection control and prevention, seem necessary.

Original languageEnglish
Article number368
JournalTropical Medicine and Infectious Disease
Volume8
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2023
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cyclospora cayetanensis
  • Cystoisospora belli
  • Intestinal parasites
  • Prevalence
  • Tabriz

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