Preserving the imperial project: documenting film - censorship practices in the gold coast (Ghana)

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Abstract

The British colonialists employed cinema from two key viewpoints; the first was the use of cinema in consolidating and promoting the economic and political agendas of the imperial project. Secondly, cinema became a critical medium through which the moral and social welfare of the natives in the British colonies were promoted. The considerably scattering of scholarly works on African cinema have explored colonial film censorship in some parts of Africa, however, the specific case of the Gold Coast (Ghana) has been an under-studied subject. The article engages a critical dialogue on how early film censorship was practised and further seeks to interrogate the nexus between the imperial project and the British colonial film censorship activities in the Gold Coast. While this paper does not claim an exhaustive treatment of the field of film censorship practices in Ghana, it endeavors to lay out an initial inroad, generate interests and critical debates in this neglected field.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)52-65
Number of pages14
JournalHistorical Journal of Film, Radio and Television
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024
Externally publishedYes

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