O Centro Católico Português e a revisão da Lei Moura Pinto (1919-1926): o debate interno na Igreja Católica

Translated title of the contribution: The Centro Católico Português and the revision of the Moura Pinto Law (1919-1926): the internal debate within the Catholic Church

João Miguel Almeida*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The decree 3 856 of the 22th February 1918 has been the main reference for discussions on the revision of the Separation of the Republic Law of the post Great War. The Act called Moura Pinto divides Catholics between those who think it should serve as a starting point for a revision of the Separation Law of 1911, and those who see it as just a variant of the Separation Law that must be rejected. This article covers the internal debate within the Catholic Church on the issue and the different positions of the Portuguese bishops. In the Republican field positions differ between those who want to improve the Moura Pinto Law in a more favorable direction to the Catholic Church and those who fight for the restoration of the "intangible" Separation Law from April 20th, 1911. As we will see, the informal understanding between the Portuguese State and the Catholic hierarchy in the Republic of the post Great War does not constitute a revision of the Separation Law to consolidate relations between the Catholic Church and the Republican State.
Translated title of the contributionThe Centro Católico Português and the revision of the Moura Pinto Law (1919-1926): the internal debate within the Catholic Church
Original languagePortuguese
Pages (from-to)111-122
Number of pages12
JournalLusitania Sacra
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

Keywords

  • Moura Pinto Law
  • Republic of the post Great War
  • Portuguese Episcopate
  • Separation Law

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