The metabolic, virulence and antimicrobial resistance profiles of colonising Streptococcus pneumoniae shift after PCV13 introduction in urban Malawi

Uri Obolski*, Todd D. Swarthout, Akuzike Kalizang’oma, Thandie S. Mwalukomo, Jia Mun Chan, Caroline M. Weight, Comfort Brown, Rory Cave, Jen Cornick, Arox Wadson Kamng’ona, Jacquline Msefula, Giuseppe Ercoli, Jeremy S. Brown, José Lourenço, Martin C. Maiden, Neil French, Sunetra Gupta, Robert S. Heyderman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
8 Downloads

Abstract

Streptococcus pneumoniae causes substantial mortality among children under 5-years-old worldwide. Polysaccharide conjugate vaccines (PCVs) are highly effective at reducing vaccine serotype disease, but emergence of non-vaccine serotypes and persistent nasopharyngeal carriage threaten this success. We investigated the hypothesis that following vaccine, adapted pneumococcal genotypes emerge with the potential for vaccine escape. We genome sequenced 2804 penumococcal isolates, collected 4-8 years after introduction of PCV13 in Blantyre, Malawi. We developed a pipeline to cluster the pneumococcal population based on metabolic core genes into “Metabolic genotypes” (MTs). We show that S. pneumoniae population genetics are characterised by emergence of MTs with distinct virulence and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) profiles. Preliminary in vitro and murine experiments revealed that representative isolates from emerging MTs differed in growth, haemolytic, epithelial infection, and murine colonisation characteristics. Our results suggest that in the context of PCV13 introduction, pneumococcal population dynamics had shifted, a phenomenon that could further undermine vaccine control and promote spread of AMR.

Original languageEnglish
Article number7477
Number of pages15
JournalNature Communications
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The metabolic, virulence and antimicrobial resistance profiles of colonising Streptococcus pneumoniae shift after PCV13 introduction in urban Malawi'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this