A procura de conciliação entre emanação e criação no diálogo entre a Patrística e a Filosofia Islâmica medieval

Translated title of the contribution: The search for conciliation between emanation and creation in Patristics and Medieval Islamic Philosophy

Samuel Dimas*

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Classical Greek reflection about the transition from the One to the multiple received, by means of the religions of the Book, the name of creation. This correspondingly conveys how, within a neo-platonic context, the notion of creation starts out being the religious concept for identifying the movement of emanation of the plural reality to the primogenous reality of the original One, progressively gaining another meaning with the introduction of the Judaic-Christian idea of creation based upon nothing (ex nihilo), as advanced by authors such as Gregory of Nyssa, Saint Augustine and Saint Thomas of Aquino. The Islamic medieval philosophy of Orient and al-Andalus, which inherited the Patristic within its search for the harmonisation of Greek thinking with Judaic-Christian theology, developed a profound debate about the search to reconcile the notion of emanation with that of creation. This attempt at conciliation becomes clear in the recourse to the Neo-platonic notion of emanation and the Aristotelian concept of first cause in order to explain the existence of plurality in the Cosmos as deriving from the unity of the first divine Being.

Translated title of the contributionThe search for conciliation between emanation and creation in Patristics and Medieval Islamic Philosophy
Original languagePortuguese
Pages (from-to)63-81
Number of pages19
JournalRevista de Hispanismo Filosofico
Issue number23
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2018

Keywords

  • Creation
  • Emanation
  • Pantheism
  • Transcendence
  • Patristic
  • Al-Andalus
  • Neoplatonism

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