Conceptualizing the impacts of dual practice on the retention of public sector specialists - evidence from South Africa

John Ashmore*, Lucy Gilson

*Autor correspondente para este trabalho

Resultado de pesquisarevisão de pares

24 Citações (Scopus)

Resumo

Background: 'Dual practice', or multiple job holding, generally involves public sector-based health workers taking additional work in the private sector. This form of the practice is purported to help retain public health care workers in low and middle-income countries' public sectors through additional wage incentives. There has been little conceptual or empirical development of the relationship between dual practice and retention. Methods: This article helps begin to fill this gap, drawing on empirical evidence from a qualitative study focusing on South African specialists. Fifty-one repeat, in-depth interviews were carried out with 28 doctors (predominantly specialists) with more than one job, in one public and one private urban hospital. Results: Findings suggest dual practice can impact both positively and negatively on specialists' intention to stay in the public sector. This is through multiple conceptual channels including those previously identified in the literature such as dual practice acting as a 'stepping stone' to private practice by reducing migration costs. Dual practice can also lead specialists to re-evaluate how they compare public and private jobs, and to overworking which can expedite decisions on whether to stay in the public sector or leave. Numerous respondents undertook dual practice without official permission. Conclusions: The idea that dual practice helps retain public specialists in South Africa may be overstated. Yet banning the practice may be ineffective, given many undertake it without permission in any case. Regulation should be better enforced to ensure dual practice is not abused. The conceptual framework developed in this article could form a basis for further qualitative and quantitative inquiry.
Idioma originalEnglish
Número do artigo3
RevistaHuman Resources for Health
Volume13
Número de emissão1
DOIs
Estado da publicaçãoPublished - 19 jan 2015
Publicado externamenteSim

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